Georgia,

Georgia - Day 2 | Mtshketa to Kazbegi

7:45 PM UrbanModish 0 Comments


Hello Kazbegi!

Kazbegi was a long ride from Tbilsi. If I remember correctly, it was almost 5-6 hours via the local bus. The journey to Kazbegi was a sight for sore eyes. It was beautiful, soothing, and tranquil. The view didn’t make it feel like a long ride at all. It was so scenic and was poetry in motion (Not exaggerating at all).











I was staying at the White House Hostel, booked via Bookings.com (not sponsored). As mentioned earlier, I loved the flexibility it offers of no upfront payment, which makes your plans very flexible.

I reached Kazbegi, and walked towards the hostel (as per how it showed on Google map). A moment of gratitude for longer days in Georgia. I crossed a bridge and headed towards the location (it was a 3-5 minutes’ walk from the main stop).  The bridge looked had a very narrow pedestrian walkway and as I gingerly walked towards the direction of my hostel, I couldn’t not admire the gorgeous lake flowing below the bridge and it seemed to be flowing from uphill.
I saw signs for the Gergeti church (which was on my list, and was thrilled how close it was to my hostel) and made notes, while heading to my hostel. I finally reached a barren piece of land that my hostel as per the map was supposed to be on (lmao). This would have essentially sent me into a fit of panic, but oddly enough, the situation was way too hilarious to panic (Yes, I’m wired weirdly).




I called the Hostel number, but couldn’t get through. So I decided to try and find the place, by asking around.  I walked backwards, and went to the area where I was dropped off and asked around.  It didn’t work that well. However, I set off to a cafe, and explained my situation. The lady who owned the place was so helpful. She called the number, found an alternate number, and asked the Hostel lady to come and pick me up from her place (Well, she literally did shout at her).

She offered me some wine (perks of getting lost), and we had a good conversation going, till my host showed up.

The Hostel was a good distance away from where the google pin had showed (lol). But it was all so worth the hassle. The view from the window was breathtaking in the morning. And I wouldn’t mind getting lost again just for the view.

I met my roomie on my way to the hostel. As I was freshening up she came back and we exchanged pleasantries. She is an ex teacher from South Korea (Gen), who has been travelling for the past 6 months (I was left mighty impressed at the thought of how brave she was). She had bought some ‘Churchkela’  - Georgian sweet. You will see it everywhere in Georgia, and I was definitely intrigued as well. It does look really weird and hence we were a bit apprehensive to try it. Churchkela, broke the ice (we made some indecent jokes about how it looked). Post our tasting session, loads of giggles and some conversation,  I decided to explore Kazbegi  (read:dinner options).




I went looking for cafe 5047m, as I read a lot of review of the place. It’s located right in the center (where the bus drops you off), but getting into the place was a bit tricky, as it has a very small entrance you might definitely miss. Don’t expect amazing service, as the place is usually packed (and also they are generally laid back). I ordered for wine and Khinkali, and waited for a really long time, and reminded them (almost hangry here) 2-3 times. It was getting really cold and they went around offering blankets (that’s when I stopped mentally complaining). The cafe has a beautiful view to watch the sunset. My khinkali’s tasted like heaven along with the wine and I savored in the moment of incredible tranquility.

I left the cafe at around 10:30 sh and jeez was it a dark (2 glasses of wine and lack of direction was not a good choice). I walked towards my hostel in pitch dark, maybe it was the wine but I didn’t really panic. Luckily, I managed to find my way back to the Hostel, and called it a night.



Much Love,

xoxo


Read Day 1 HERE
Read Day 2 HERE


“All you need to know is that it’s possible.” – Wolf, an Appalachian Trail Hiker

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